Cureus Advisor Dr. George Lundberg Wins 2014 ASCP Ward Burdick Award for Distinguished Service to Pathology

Cureus is thrilled to share the news that Dr. George Lundberg, special advisor to Cureus, was recently bestowed the 2014 ASCP Ward Burick Award for Distinguished Service to Pathology. Awarded annually by the Board of Directors of the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), the ASCP Ward Burick Award was presented to Dr. Lundberg during the ASCP Annual Meeting in Tampa, Florida on October 9.

Citing Dr. Lundberg’s illustrious career and extensive history as both educator and editor, the ASCP stated, “Dr. Lundberg has advocated for pathologists to play the critical role as the ‘interpreter’ who guides clinicians to select the appropriate diagnostic test and encourages medical laboratories to focus on the quality outcomes of diagnostic testing, rather than the volume of testing they perform.”

Dr. George LundbergWhen asked for his reactions to winning the ASCP Ward Burick Award, Dr. George Lundberg stated, “I have always, or at least since about 1969, believed that a laboratory test is a loop that begins when an individual decides to obtain a laboratory test, proceeds through a series of some 9 steps such as ordering, specimen collection, transportation, analysis, reporting and interpretation and ends with an action. Like a chain being only as strong as its weakest link, the test is only valid if all steps are completed correctly. In 2014, in AJCP, I proposed that we should add a 10th step…outcome….as a routine in what has come to be known as the ‘Brain to Brain Loop in Laboratory Testing.'”

Join us in congratulating Dr. Lundberg on his achievement – we are thrilled that he is part of the Cureus team!

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ZEISS/Cureus Competition Spotlight: 1st & 2nd Place Articles

ZEISS recently partnered with Cureus to host a publishing competition focused on microscope-integrated intraoperative fluorescence. The competition attracted articles submitted from all over the world, with the final field of published articles standing at 10. While prizes have already been awarded, we wanted to take some time to recognize a few of the highest-scoring articles.

The articles featured today finished the competition in 1st and 2nd place, respectively.

With a final SIQ score of 7.5, the winner of the Grand Prize for Scientific Acclaim, A Bioengineered Peptide that Localizes to and Illuminates Medulloblastoma: A New Tool with Potential for Fluorescence-Guided Surgical Resection was submitted by Shelley Ackerman, Christy Wilson, Suzana Kahn, James Kintzing, Darren Jindal, Samuel Cheshier, Gerald Grant & Jennifer Cochran.

Cureus Co-Editor-in-Chief Dr. Alexander Muacevic had this to say about the winning article, “It’s all about finding ways to better illuminate brain tumors for complete tumor resection – something I feel this article certainly accomplished.”

The 2nd place article, recieving an SIQ score of 7.0, was Fluorescence-Guided Tumor Visualization Using the Tumor Paint BLZ-100, and was submitted by David Kittle, Adam Mamelak, Julia Parrish-Novak, Stacey Hansen, Rameshwar Patil, Pallavi Gangalum, Julia Ljubimova, Keith Black and Pramod Butte.

Dr. Muacevic, again with his thoughts: “This is an interesting new innovation and I congratulate the authors for their work. They developed an imaging system for in-vivo imaging of the tumor ligand BLZ-100 for use in surgical resections of gliomas. Next step is to prove the clinical application. Ultimately the question remains if a clinical benefit in terms of prolonged survival can be demonstrated using this new innovation.”

Meanwhile, Cureus Founder and Co-Editor-in-Chief, Dr. John Adler chipped in with his reaction: “Both of these gorgeous articles are examples of cutting edge science which will enable futuristic intraoperative fluorescence techniques to do ever better tumor resections.”

We’re thrilled that these excellent articles were submitted and published as part of the competition and we’re looking forward to publishing many more as our competitions continue! Stay tuned for a look at the 3rd place article!

Introducing Patient Reported Outcomes: Telling Both Sides of the Story

We’re excited to announce the addition of Patient Reported Outcomes to Cureus! Cureus articles are written by practicing physicians or medical researchers with an audience consisting of largely the same population. With Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs), Cureus is adding a new wrinkle to this tried-and-true system by allowing patients studied within Cureus articles to share the spotlight with the physicians and researchers.

With a PRO, a patient gets to share his or her experience from the other side of the knife, so to speak. From consultation to procedure to post-op, our readers can get a layman’s perspective while also learning what it would be like to undergo such a procedure themselves. Not only are PROs beneficial to potential patients, but to doctors as well. The inclusion of a Patient Reported Outcome with your published article can provide relevant, easily digestible evidence when recommending certain procedures to your current patients – just direct them to the PRO as a way of educating them about a potential course of action.

A recently published PROEach submitted PRO receives editing for spelling and grammatical errors by Cureus staff, but all PROs are otherwise published as is, with no interference from the article authors or the Cureus editorial team. PRO authors can also include supplemental images to be published alongside their words.

Check out our first published PROs below! Just click on the link and then click the purple “PRO” tab near the top of the article to read the patient reported outcomes for the following articles:

Transient Tumor Volume Increase in Vestibular Schwannomas after Radiotherapy

CyberKnife Ablation for Intramedullary Spinal Cord Arteriovenous Malformations (AVMs): A Promising New Therapeutic Approach

Would you like to add a PRO to one of your published articles? Contact your patient today – once patient consent has been obtained, we’ll gladly start a dialogue with the patient author!

Cureus Team Building: Crawfishing in Pescadero Creek

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9S2A5710Our team has been hard at work creating the best possible experience for the Cureus community, and while hard work is its own reward, we were lucky enough to escape the office recently for a day of good old-fashioned team building. How did the fine folks at Cureus elect to spend the day? Hunting for crayfish (aka crawfish aka crawdads) of course!

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The gang packed up nets, bacon (for bait!) and picnic lunches before heading down the coast to Pescadero, California. Home to the appropriately-named Pescadero Creek, Pescadero is a wonderfully secluded and picturesque town just a few short miles from the Pacific coast. It was here, along the muddy banks of the Pescadero Creek, that the Cureus team went to work, baiting and trapping crawfish with the same verve and zeal normally reserved for design, development and customer support.

IMG_7151Utilizing skilled techniques passed down through generations of Barrettos (Chris Barretto, Cureus VP of Engineering), we set bait with mouthwatering raw bacon and proceeded to wait, and wait, and wait and finally poke and prod the delightfully plentiful crawfish into our awaiting nets. It was messy business, and there were more than a few cuts, spills and even one unfortunate crawfish attack, resulting in a well-deserved wound to the finger. But just as with web design and editorial duties, these trials eventually gave way to well-earned rewards. The final tally? 55 crawfish, 8 dirty but happy Cureus team members and 1 very nice dinner

IMG_7150The team made it back to work the next day, all in one piece and now the march continues as we work to bring you the very best medical journal on the web. We’re very excited about our recent channels and competition, and we’ll be ready to announce new features very soon. Thanks again for your continued support. Don’t forget to contact us with suggestions, criticism and the like!

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The Cureus Team toasts to a job well done before sitting down to enjoy the day’s catch.
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Crawfish!

Cureus Channels: A Window into Your Organization

It’s a new age for medicine, and for medical journals, too. The advent of many exciting, cutting-edge medical techniques is mirrored by the rise in popularity of online journals. While the traditional print journals are led by stalwarts such as New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA and Nature, the recent explosion of online journals makes it more difficult than ever to stick out from the crowd.

Perhaps you’re a physician or researcher who’s looking to publish your work; as anyone who’s published before knows, there are a multitude of factors that influence such a decision. What can the hundreds of different online journals do to convince you that they’re the right place to publish?

Cureus channels offer a wholly unique opportunity to medical schools, departments and professional societies that have opted not to produce a journal of their own. Creating a journal is an expensive and complicated endeavor; however, there are myriad benefits to having your group’s members published in the same place, perhaps covering the same general topic area.

Some groups will create their own journals, and for those societies with ample cash and an extensive queue of articles ready to be published, perhaps that’s the right choice. But what about everyone else? Maybe your school doesn’t have a few million dollars to spare, or maybe your society is a small, but growing group with a steadily increasing stream of articles.

SMISS Channel
The SMISS Channel

A Cureus channel could be the answer. Offering the chance to gather all of your school or society’s clinical and research activities in one place, a Cureus channel is a unique branded page that increases your visibility by assisting in clinical research publication and promotion to broad professional and patient communities. Cureus is currently hosting channels for the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology, the International Pediatric Simulation Society, the Society for Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery, and ZEISS.

Each organization appoints a channel editor to oversee submissions and encourage fellow members to contribute, but the foundational editorial work is all handled by Cureus. Think of a channel as a window into your organization, a place to see what your colleagues or fellow students are up to, all while exchanging valuable research and information in your field of expertise. We’ve launched four channels so far, with several more on the way. Get in touch with us today if you’d like to explore whether or not a channel is right for you.

Our Intraoperative Fluorescence Research Publishing Competition is Now Live!

We’re thrilled to announce that the Intraoperative Fluorescence Research Publishing Competition sponsored by ZEISS is now live! (And yes, we know the title is a mouthful.) A part of our first article publishing competition, we’ve partnered with the good folks over at ZEISS to create an outlet for all the latest research concerning microscope-integrated intraoperative fluorescence.

Intraoperative Fluorescence

The competition will remain open through July 28th, 2014 so you’ve still got plenty of time to gather your research and submit your work. We’ve already spent time elsewhere going over the competition details (check out the competition page if you don’t believe me), so instead of rehashing all the boring details, I’ll use this opportunity to focus on the truly good stuff, the stuff that should be getting you excited to enter our competition.

And what’s that, you ask? Two things:

  1. Our outstanding collection of reviewers hand-picked specifically for this competition. Led by Dr. Robert Spetzler, our reviewer pool features 9 highly accomplished professionals in the world of neuroscience. This is a rare opportunity to have your research reviewed by an esteemed group of physicians offering constructive feedback that could help you throughout your research career.
  2. Cold hard cash prizes. The author of the article with the highest SIQ score will be awarded the Grand Prize for Scientific Acclaim along with a cool $3,000. And that’s not all – two additional “Educator” Awards will be handed out (along with $1,000 each) to the authors of the articles with the most views and audience engagement, respectively.

And just as a reminder, publishing with Cureus is always 100% free. No strings attached. So what do you have to lose? Take a look at the competition details and enter your research today!

Not sure if this competition is right for you? Leave a comment on this post (or email us at [email protected]) and we’ll get right back to you with all the information you need.

Why Should You Care About SIQ?

If you’ve spent much time around Cureus you’ve probably (hopefully?) heard of Scholarly Impact Quotient, or SIQ. At Cureus we’re committed to reducing the barrier to publication for physicians and medical researchers and a big part of that is making it easy to assess the merit of published articles.

Backing up for a second, I think we can all agree that Impact Factor is showing its age. Long considered the be-all, end-all when it comes to measuring article quality, Impact Factor has devolved into the proverbial snake that ate its tail, with article importance determined by journal importance, when clearly it should be the other way around.

We created SIQ as a means to improve the way an article’s “impact” is deciphered. SIQ allows all registered users to assess the relative merits of a published article. Although the judgments of an individual, or even a limited number of peer reviewer(s), can be flawed, there is an innate “wisdom of the crowd” that is harnessed by SIQ. Furthermore, SIQ is grounded in statistical power; the judgment of “the many” can diminish the biased influence of “a few.” In this way, the Cureus review process results in a more accurate measure of article quality.

Screen Shot 2014-04-29 at 4.39.04 PMSo now you’re probably thinking, “Ok, great – but how does that help me?” Well, as a published author with Cureus, it’s in your best interest to have a high SIQ score. Once you’ve published, the natural inclination is to lean back in your chair, exhale and maybe have a celebratory glass of your favorite beverage. And to that I say, “Well earned.” BUT – your work isn’t quite done yet! The hard part is definitely over, no need to worry, but by sharing your published article with your friends and colleagues (and urging them to honestly assess your article with SIQ) you will boost your article’s visibility and its perception amongst the Cureus community. So next time you publish with Cureus, take an extra 5 minutes and share your article with the world.