Welcome To Cureus Fall 2012 Poster Competition

Welcome To Cureus Fall 2012 Poster Competition

John Adler, MD, Professor of Neurosurgery, Stanford University and Editor-in-Chief at Cureus, officially kicks off the Cureus Fall 2012 Poster Competition in his latest video.

Our Poster Competition is open to medical and doctoral students as well as residents and fellows. Poster submission period will be open until Friday October 5. Winners will be announced Monday October 22.

One Grand Prize Winner will receive $1,000 — along with cash prizes awarded for top posters in each category.

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Medical Posters Find A Home Online At Cureus

Medical Posters Find A Home Online At Cureus

Who would have thought that the scores of posters you presented in medical school or graduate school, through residency, internship, fellowship and beyond, would contribute so effectively to the building of your CV? And the posters you might be drafting now AS a student…

Now, posters are not simply abstracts or listings in a Conference Proceedings, but once published on Cureus, they become fully visible in the world of medical knowledge. Beyond that, our users, editors and reviewers will gladly point you in the direction of turning that “outline” and those preliminary results into a publishable peer reviewed article, that also will be viewed by all as soon as it is submitted to Cureus.

Posters can now become published as unique citable entities. And “manuscripts in progress”/ “manuscripts under review”? Forget about that list! Cureus makes the “in progress” into actual progress and makes the “under review” into published in a matter of days rather than months or years.

Publish everything you have. Those piles of data are useful and the world wants to learn from them. You want a CV full of publications, right? Cureus will make that happen, and it will happen quickly, starting with a submitted poster!

Medical Posters — Talking To Your Audience

Medical Posters — Talking To Your Audience

The Cur&#275us video team brought our cameras out to the Stanford University School of Medicine to start a conversation with students about why the process of creating Medical Posters is so important.

“For me posters are usually very useful for preliminary versions of figures and really to serve as a sounding board for ongoing research that will later be put into manuscripts —so it’s nice to be able to get that feedback.” Kail Miller, MD, PhD told Cureus.

Special thanks to Robert Lober, MD, PhD, Kail Miller, MD, PhD — MD canditates Abdullah Feroz and Marc Carmichael, PhD for participating in our video conversation.

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Things I Wish I Knew When Creating My First Poster

Things I Wish I Knew When Creating My First Poster

I made my first scientific poster for the 2007 Society for Neuroscience Annual meeting in San Diego, which is recently enough to remember just how clueless I was about creating an effective poster for a scientific conference.

I was fortunate enough to have the guidance of my incredibly patient research advisor, Amherst College’s Professor Stephen George. Of course not everyone is lucky enough to have an advisor like him, and at every meeting I’ve ever been to at least one presenter shows up with a completely disorganized poster filled with cramped text, or a poster that is printed on a series of different pieces of paper. This is why I’m writing down a few things every first poster maker must know, starting with the most obvious.

A poster is a mini article, presented in bullets and pictures rather than text. Don’t re-invent the wheel; start by looking at successful posters and use their formatting and style as a loose guide for what works.

In time I hope that Cureus will become a resource for poster-makers to collaborate on poster design in addition to sharing scientific ideas. One of the most popular and basic poster tools is Microsoft PowerPoint, although many other software programs can be used as well. If using PowerPoint, make a 60 inch wide x 36 inch tall slide within the page setup menu, and use approximately font size 72 for titles and approximately font size 18 for body.

Organize your poster in a way that is broken down logically to tell a story and to sell a conclusion. Many posters break the presented information into “Background”, “Methods”, etc. In general you should be able to read all of the text in a poster in less than five minutes. Prof George once told me that if my college roommates couldn’t sit still long enough to understand what my poster was about, it probably had too many details and too much text.

Finally, give yourself lots of time to design your poster, even if all of your bullets and figures are ready to go. Formatting a visually attractive poster takes a lot of time.

Tips for Compelling Academic Posters

Tips for Compelling Academic Posters

John Adler, MD, Professor of Neurosurgery, Stanford University; Editor-in-Chief, Cur&#275us, offers tips for “Selling Your Story” to authors of academic posters.

One of the main things to focus on is impressive visuals. This helps you grab the attention of your audience in a room full of posters. And since you have a short period of time to get your story across, visuals are critical. As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. Watch the video below.

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