ZEISS/Cureus Competition Spotlight: 3rd Place Article

ZEISS recently partnered with Cureus to host a publishing competition focused on microscope-integrated intraoperative fluorescence. The competition attracted articles submitted from all over the world, with the final field of published articles standing at 10. While prizes have already been awarded, we wanted to take some time to recognize a few of the highest-scoring articles.

Today we’ll take a look at the 3rd place article, “Indocyanine Green Videoangiography and Intraoperative Catheter Digital Subtraction Angiography in the Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms: A Consecutive Series of 235 Cases,” written by Archie Defillo, Mushtaq Qureshi and Eric Nussbaum. Receiving an SIQ score of 6.9, this deserving article could’ve easily finished in either of the top two spots.

Cureus Editor-in-Chief Dr. John Adler was impressed with the scope of the article, focusing on the fact that “this article represents one of the largest published clinical series reporting experience with intraoperative fluorescence microscopy.”

Co-Editor-in-Chief Dr. Alexander Muacevic was also pleased with the article: “Large patient series of Indocyanine Green Videoangiography and Intraoperative Catheter Digital Subtraction Angiography in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms with distinct results and suggestions for the daily clinical praxis. Interesting to read for all neurovascular surgeons.”

Perhaps the size of this study is a sign that we’ll soon see larger and larger undertakings in the research and reporting of intraoperative fluorescence. That’s it for our coverage of the ZEISS/Cureus Intraoperative Fluorescence Publishing Competition. You can find the complete list of published articles here. Contact us at info@cureus.com to learn more about hosting your own competition!

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Cureus Advisor Dr. George Lundberg Wins 2014 ASCP Ward Burdick Award for Distinguished Service to Pathology

Cureus is thrilled to share the news that Dr. George Lundberg, special advisor to Cureus, was recently bestowed the 2014 ASCP Ward Burick Award for Distinguished Service to Pathology. Awarded annually by the Board of Directors of the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), the ASCP Ward Burick Award was presented to Dr. Lundberg during the ASCP Annual Meeting in Tampa, Florida on October 9.

Citing Dr. Lundberg’s illustrious career and extensive history as both educator and editor, the ASCP stated, “Dr. Lundberg has advocated for pathologists to play the critical role as the ‘interpreter’ who guides clinicians to select the appropriate diagnostic test and encourages medical laboratories to focus on the quality outcomes of diagnostic testing, rather than the volume of testing they perform.”

Dr. George LundbergWhen asked for his reactions to winning the ASCP Ward Burick Award, Dr. George Lundberg stated, “I have always, or at least since about 1969, believed that a laboratory test is a loop that begins when an individual decides to obtain a laboratory test, proceeds through a series of some 9 steps such as ordering, specimen collection, transportation, analysis, reporting and interpretation and ends with an action. Like a chain being only as strong as its weakest link, the test is only valid if all steps are completed correctly. In 2014, in AJCP, I proposed that we should add a 10th step…outcome….as a routine in what has come to be known as the ‘Brain to Brain Loop in Laboratory Testing.'”

Join us in congratulating Dr. Lundberg on his achievement – we are thrilled that he is part of the Cureus team!

SBMT and Cureus Team Up To Accelerate the Publication of Leading Edge Neuroscience

One challenge of the twenty-first century is to catalyze the development of medical advances from basic science. To help accelerate diagnostic and therapeutic discoveries, one of the leading multispecialty and multidisciplinary associations, Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics, has teamed with Cureus, an innovative online open-access medical journal, to bring together clinicians, scientists, engineers and policy makers from multiple disciplines who share this aspiration of improving patient care. The two cutting edge organizations believe their partnership is essential to bring about advances in neurosurgery, radiology, neurology, stem cell research, nanotechnology and psychiatry.

“Cureus is a free, open access, peer-reviewed journal that rapidly publishes a broad range of medical science including all types of articles, posters and meeting abstracts,” said John Adler, Professor of Neurosurgery at Stanford University and Cureus Founder.

Cureus’ browser based tools enable well written articles to be routinely peer reviewed and published in less than one week. The journal is the first and only journal employing “crowd sourcing” to ascertain the scientific quality of published peer-reviewed articles. While accepting a broad range of medical science, Cureus focuses on advanced technology and innovative medical procedures. Additionally, case reports are enthusiastically welcomed and routinely published.

“Cureus seeks to find the broadest possible audience for every paper, including curious patients, and uniquely offers a “Patient Reported Outcome” section that runs in parallel with articles reporting clinical outcomes,” stated John Adler.

Cureus also uniquely supports the solicitation of charitable gifts to an author’s not-for-profit research fund; this could be a great tool for SBMT, which is a non-profit organization that encourages scientists in areas of brain mapping, engineering, stem cells, nanotechnology, imaging, and medical devices to improve the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with neurological disorders.

“We believe this collaboration will provide an additional tool for our colleagues and members who are thinking out of the box and taking a multidisciplinary approach to solving complex neurological disorders,” said Dr. Ramin Rak, SBMT board member and neurosurgeon at Winthrop University.

Cureus and SBMT will be exhibiting their vision at the Congress of Neurological Surgeons in Boston, MA next week from October 20-22 at booth 660 in the exhibit hall of the Boston Convention Center.

To learn more about SBMT, visit http://www.worldbrainmapping.org

Cureus in the Field: A Visit to Carl Zeiss Meditec

ZEISS 1 A few members of the Cureus team recently took some time out of their day to visit the folks over at Carl Zeiss Meditec in warm, sunny Dublin, California. (Weather that is, sadly, all too rare here in San Francisco.) The purpose of our visit was to provide a wrap-up of the recently concluded ZEISS/Cureus Intraoperative Fluorescence Publishing Competition.

We delivered the final competition statistics and took a look at all of the great articles submitted as part of the competition. We can’t thank ZEISS enough for taking a chance on this original and exciting marketing opportunity, an opportunity that both parties can now comfortably label a success!

Stay tuned for more information on future Cureus publishing competitions and feel free to reach out to us at info@cureus.com if your organization is interested in learning more about this exciting opportunity!

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ZEISS & Cureus Intraoperative Fluorescence Competition Results

Five months, ten published articles and countless article views later, we’ve finally arrived at the finish line. Cureus would like to thank all of the submitting authors for their excellent work, the reviewer panel for their tireless efforts and the Cureus community for pitching in to read and score the articles. By publishing ten articles on the topic of microscope-integrated intraoperative fluorescence, we’ve managed to increase the world literature on the topic by roughly 27%!

Additionally, the competition has thus far generated 19,617 article views and 377 article scorings – we’re beyond excited that our authors’ work has generated such a fevered response.

As a reminder, prizes are awarded to three articles: The Grand Prize for Scientific Acclaim ($3,000) is awarded to the article with the highest SIQ score. Educator Awards ($1,000 each) are awarded to two articles: the most viewed article and the article receiving the most audience engagement (SIQ scorings + comments).

Without further ado, we’re pleased to announce the winning articles of the ZEISS/Cureus Intraoperative Fluorescence Publishing Competition:

Grand Prize for Scientific Acclaim (7.5 SIQ): “A Bioengineered Peptide that Localizes to and Illuminates Medulloblastoma: A New Tool with Potential for Fluorescence-Guided Surgical Resection” by Ackerman, Wilson, Kahn, Kintzing, Jindal, Cheshier, Grant & Cochran

Educator Award (6,713 article views): “The Use of 5-ALA in Glioblastoma Resection: Two Cases with Long-Term Progression-Free Survival” by Awad & Sloan

Educator Award (92 audience actions): “Intraoperative Photodynamic Surgery (iPDS) with Acridine Orange for Musculoskeletal Sarcomas​” by Kusuzaki, Matsubara, Satonaka, Matsumine, Nakamura, Sudo, Murata, Hosogi & Baldini

Winning submitting authors will be contacted with additional instructions for claiming their prizes.

Complete competition statistics:

  • 19,617 article views
  • 377 SIQ scorings
  • 80 author and audience article shares
  • 670 clicks resulting from these shares
  • 8 minutes – the average engagement time per user

Thanks again to all of the competition authors, reviewers and community members for helping determine our winners. Please feel free to contact us at info@cureus.com if you’d like to learn more about our publishing competitions.

The Wonders of the Cured U.S. Ebola Patients

I should preface this post by saying that I am not a doctor, nor am I in medical school. I’m just a guy, albeit a guy who works for Cureus and lives with a doctor, and therefore a guy who is very keen on following all the latest advancements and breakthroughs in the world of medicine.  With this morning’s news that Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol have been discharged from Emory University Hospital, a positive ray of light has pierced the seemingly ever-present storm clouds hovering over the world, whether one looks to the Russia/Ukraine border, Ferguson, Missouri or the Gaza Strip.

From the New York Times:

The two American aid workers who were the first patients ever to be treated for the Ebola virus at a hospital in the United States have been released, capping a transcontinental medical drama that stirred public debate about whether any American with the virus should have been allowed to return.

Emory University Hospital, which admitted Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol to a specialized isolation ward earlier this month, said both were discharged after at least two weeks of treatment. Dr. Brantly was released on Thursday, the hospital said, after Ms. Writebol was quietly discharged on Tuesday.

While the media would have you believe that contracting Ebola is akin to a death sentence, that is simply not the case. According to WHO statistics, Liberia and Sierra Leone are reporting death rates of 56% and 43% respectively (of those infected with the disease). With the United States now standing at a 0% death rate for those treated on U.S. soil, one has to wonder if the successful treatment of Writebol and Brantly might possibly signify the beginning of more advanced treatment of this terrible disease – treatment resulting in far lower death rates than those reported in Liberia and Sierra Leone.

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The exact cause of the treatment’s success has yet to be determined; it’s entirely possible that Brantly and Writebol are just two of the lucky few, with no more to it than that. If that’s not all, though, then we must all hope that the technology, medication and treatment methods used in these cases soon find there way to Africa.

Researching Intraoperative Fluorescence? We’re Running a Competition!

You may have already heard the news – we’re running a publishing competition! Along with ZEISS and Dr. Robert Spetzler, Cureus is proud to announce the Intraoperative Fluorescence Publishing Competition (beginning May 12th, 2014).

Our goal is to unearth and report all the latest experiences with microscope-integrated intraoperative fluorescence, and we want your help.

Are you or is someone you know actively involved in this field of neurosurgery? What has your clinical experience taught you about the indications and outcome from using this groundbreaking technology?

Our reviewer pool consists of several leading neurosurgeons who have graciously volunteered to peer review every article entered into the competition. What’s better than having your work reviewed by some of the best minds in your field? We can’t think of anything! And if that’s not enough, we also have $5,000 to award to authors of the top articles.

So what are you waiting for? If you or someone you know has been working in the field of intraoperative fluorescence, now is the time to finalize that research and prepare for the official competition launch on May 12th, 2014.

A quick rundown of the competition:

  • We’re looking for the latest and greatest research concerning microscope-integrated intraoperative fluorescence.
  • Case reports, original articles, technical reports and review articles will all be accepted. (Previously published articles will not be accepted.)
  • A top prize of $3,000 will be awarded to the article with the highest SIQ score.
  • Two additional prizes of $1,000 will be awarded to the articles with the most audience engagement via shares, comments, etc.
  • The competition begins on Monday, May 12th, 2014 with the submission period closing on Monday, July 28th, 2014. Winners will be announced on Monday, August 25th, 2014.

Remember to share this with your friends and colleagues – anyone can enter (it’s free) and anyone can win! If you have any questions, feel free to contact us at support@cureus.com. Good luck!