Calling All Academic Departments: It’s Time to Share Your Hard Work With the World

Close your eyes and picture the following (it probably won’t be difficult):

Your academic department is full of hard-working researchers and practicing physicians. Cutting edge research and innovative clinical experiences are everywhere. Trusted veteran physicians and up-and-coming stars are working together. All of your department’s faculty and residents know that their collective work is making a difference. Worthy of praise, funding and patient referrals.

But does anyone else know?

By partnering with Cureus you can ensure that fellow physicians around the world are updated on the latest and greatest from your department. All Cureus channel partners receive their very own branded, quarterly email digests that are managed and sent by Cureus.

Featuring hand-picked, recently published articles from your department as well as author head shots, a Cureus quarterly digest is an excellent way to raise awareness surrounding your department, boost the profile of up-and-coming faculty and even gain patient referrals.

We invite each of our channel partners to customize their quarterly’s messaging to fit their department’s unique goals. With thousands of recipients and sky-high open and click rates, we’re confident that a Cureus quarterly digest is the best value for your department’s marketing budget. Take a look at the examples below, and contact us at [email protected] to learn how your department can reach physicians and researchers around the world.

Note: partial view of quarterly digest.
Note: partial view of quarterly digest.
Note: partial view of quarterly digest.
Note: partial view of quarterly digest.
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Enhance Your Published Article by Adding a Patient Reported Outcome

Have you published an original article or case report featuring a patient who would want to share his or her story? Contact your featured patients and tell them about this exciting opportunity to describe their experience in a way that fellow and future patients can understand.

Let’s be frank, journal articles aren’t the most accessible reading outside of the medical community. Adding a Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) is a fantastic way to highlight clinical experience from the perspective that matters most – the patient’s. Preparing for treatment can be a stressful, frightening time. Hearing from someone who’s already experienced it – all in their own words – can make a world of difference when deciding who to entrust with one’s health.

Here’s how it works, and remember that publishing a PRO alongside your article is free!

We ask that you reach out to your patient first. Once the patient has agreed to participate, we’ll take over from there – it’s that easy! When the patient has submitted his or her PRO, we’ll edit for spelling and grammatical errors; their words will otherwise be published as is, with no interference from the article authors or Cureus staff. PRO authors can also include supplemental images.

Here’s a few examples:Transient Tumor Volume Increase in Vestibular Schwannomas after Radiotherapy and CyberKnife Ablation for Intramedullary Spinal Cord Arteriovenous Malformations (AVMs): A Promising New Therapeutic Approach

Take advantage of this unique feature to make your published article something special. Reach out to your featured patients and contact [email protected] to learn more!

Is your Academic Department Getting the Most Out of its Marketing?

Thousands spent on traditional mailer campaigns. Countless hours spent printing, packing and sending department-produced newsletters or magazines. How many are dumped in the recycling without being opened? Every academic department with a serious interest in promotion needs to ask itself – is that investment of time and money really worth it?

In a word – no. We live in an increasingly digital age, and although some industries continue to do things the old-fashioned way, paying to produce a mail a hard copy newsletter or magazine just isn’t efficient anymore. We’ve created Cureus Channels as a way to fill this void while taking full advantage of all the latest and greatest digital technology.

Your department’s custom, branded Channel homepage serves as the one-stop shop for all of your latest published research and clinical experiences, as well as departmental news, media, event info and more! What’s more, we’ll also send out a branded quarterly email digest highlighting some of your latest articles and their authors. We work with you to fashion each quarterly digest to your liking – you pick the articles and authors to feature and supply a short introductory message and we take care of the rest!Screen Shot 2015-01-29 at 11.58.29 AM

Promote up-and-coming faculty, gain referrals and raise your department’s profile throughout the medical research community with a Cureus Channel. Contact me today at [email protected] to learn more.

Publishing with Cureus for the first time? Check out our new how-to videos!

New to Cureus? Has it been awhile since you last published with us? Good news! Our revamped Author Guide now features a series of short, snackable how-to videos designed to walk you through each step of the article submission process.

Just click the blue video icon next to select headers located throughout the Author Guide to view a short video walking you through that specific step of the submission process. We recommend taking a few minutes to watch the videos for each of the eight article submission steps before beginning the process. Taking ten minutes now will save you time later!

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Comments from an Invited Reviewer: How Cureus is Different

Here at Cureus we take author and reviewer satisfaction very seriously. We strive to respond to all questions, comments and complaints as soon we can, often within just a few hours. If you’re familiar with the Cureus mission, you know that constructing a publication process devoid of politics (and supporting the increased transparency that comes with it) are our primary goals.
With that in mind, we’d like to share a recent exchange between an anonymous Cureus peer-reviewer unhappy with the amount of time he received to review an article.

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Reviewer: Less than a week for an academic neurosurgeon to provide a review? Hmmmm.

Cureus: I was forwarded your recent email lament about the review period ending on a paper to which you were recently invited to comment. I wanted to reach out to you by email to firstly, thank you for responding, and secondly to explain a little bit more how the Cureus review process is designed to work, which as you perhaps noted is quite different than traditional journals.

As an academic neurosurgeon myself, I am all too aware that sometimes it can be impossible to find the time to review a manuscript just because one is just too darn busy. That is a given!! What happens in traditional journals routinely is that such busy academics plan to review a paper but for a range of reasons never get around to it. Therefore, the editor in chief and staff of most journals spend most of their time (and journal money) chasing down reviewers and as a result the process of review can last for months in many cases. We at Cureus have tried to do something quite different in our review process. We invite a number of reviewers to review but we fully expect most to be too busy and decline. If anyone is busy, it is quite ok to decline, our Cureus editorial team totally understands. However, the expectation is that a few of the invited reviewers will have both the time and the interest to perform a timely review……in fact, we are eventually hoping to achieve a review cycle of just a few days.

While this review cycle is better than nearly all other medical journals, it should be noted that NEJM does offer a turn around time in a week for some selected topics so this objective is not totally beyond current trends at the most selective journals. By resetting expectations for reviews, Cureus hopes to avoid the many month review cycles that are commonplace with JNS or Neurosurgery for example. The beauty of a faster review cycle is that the reviewed article remains fresh in everyone’s mind so that a lot of time is not wasted reacquainting oneself (both author and reviewers) with the article and any reviewer comments that emanate with each review cycle. Moreover, Cureus’ in-browser reviewing tool makes it easier than ever for a reviewer to comment on a paper and communicate their critique directly to the author. In the process hopefully everyone wins. The ultimate objective is to accelerate the process of publishing/documenting medical science, which I believe to be a net positive.

Clearly your first interaction with Cureus was less than ideal. I am hoping that after my explanation here you might give Cureus another try? In particular I would love you to perhaps even consider publishing your own article in our totally FREE open access journal, an experience first hand how a faster/easier review process can even make publishing peer reviewed papers FUN!!  I note that you are a DBS guy and by virtue of such you clearly must be comfortable with new ideas and technology. As Cureus seeks to innovate in the medical journal space, we especially welcome early adopters like yourself.

I am happy to answer any further questions should you have any or address any other concerns your might have.

Reviewer: Many thanks for your email and clarification. I do agree that the review process is often too lengthy, especially with the journals you mention. Sadly, even with the best will in the world, the pressures of clinical work and other academic deadlines do not make it feasible for me to provide a thorough review on a paper within a week of receiving the request.

That said, now that I understand the philosophy behind the Cureus review process and I do like the idea. It is a clean and workable solution, but I fear it may work against the clinical scientist, especially in the surgical field where time is more limited.

I do find publishing fun … especially the debate with constructive reviewers. I will think of Cureus if I have any suitable material in the coming months.

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A fair argument? What do you think?

Introducing Patient Reported Outcomes: Telling Both Sides of the Story

We’re excited to announce the addition of Patient Reported Outcomes to Cureus! Cureus articles are written by practicing physicians or medical researchers with an audience consisting of largely the same population. With Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs), Cureus is adding a new wrinkle to this tried-and-true system by allowing patients studied within Cureus articles to share the spotlight with the physicians and researchers.

With a PRO, a patient gets to share his or her experience from the other side of the knife, so to speak. From consultation to procedure to post-op, our readers can get a layman’s perspective while also learning what it would be like to undergo such a procedure themselves. Not only are PROs beneficial to potential patients, but to doctors as well. The inclusion of a Patient Reported Outcome with your published article can provide relevant, easily digestible evidence when recommending certain procedures to your current patients – just direct them to the PRO as a way of educating them about a potential course of action.

A recently published PROEach submitted PRO receives editing for spelling and grammatical errors by Cureus staff, but all PROs are otherwise published as is, with no interference from the article authors or the Cureus editorial team. PRO authors can also include supplemental images to be published alongside their words.

Check out our first published PROs below! Just click on the link and then click the purple “PRO” tab near the top of the article to read the patient reported outcomes for the following articles:

Transient Tumor Volume Increase in Vestibular Schwannomas after Radiotherapy

CyberKnife Ablation for Intramedullary Spinal Cord Arteriovenous Malformations (AVMs): A Promising New Therapeutic Approach

Would you like to add a PRO to one of your published articles? Contact your patient today – once patient consent has been obtained, we’ll gladly start a dialogue with the patient author!

Raise Money with a Contribution Link on Your Cureus Article

Would you like to raise money for your research fund or a charity related to your research or clinical efforts? Now you can with a Cureus contribution link! Each contribution link features a custom image or logo representing a fund or foundation of your choosing. Clicking on a contribution link enables anyone viewing a Cureus article to quickly navigate to the donation page of that research fund or charity organization.

contributionlink

How are contribution links added to articles?
We’ve made it a very simple process. To get the ball rolling, just email us at [email protected] Include the name of your previously published or soon-to-be published article as well as a link to the donation page of the research fund or charity website that you’d like to support. We ask only that the contribution recipient be somehow related to your work (it doesn’t have to relate to the specific article). For example, it could be your own research fund or a charity organization dedicated to fighting lung cancer.

As with all aspects of Cureus publishing, adding a contribution link is 100% free, so don’t miss this great opportunity to raise some money and do some good, whether it’s for a medical charity near and dear to your heart or your own research fund. Give your audience a chance to make a difference and contact us today.