Autologous Epidermal Grafting: Announcing the Competition Winner!

kci-competition-email-winners-announcedThe SIQ scoring period has ended and the scores have been tabulated. We are pleased to announce the following articles as winners of the Clinical and Economic Benefits of Autologous Epidermal Grafting publishing competition:

1st place, 9.3 SIQ: “Clinical and Economic Benefits of Autologous Epidermal Grafting” by Maderal & Kirsner

2nd place, 9.0 SIQ: “A Case Series of Complex Recalcitrant Wounds Treated with Epidermal Grafts Harvested from an Automated Device” by Cai, Gowda, Chopra et al.

3rd place, 6.0 SIQ: “Autologous Epidermal Grafting Using a Novel Negative Pressure Epidermal Harvesting System in a Case of Stable Vitiligoby” by Krishna, Thirunavukkarasu, Krishnan et al.

As you can see, the battle for first place came down to the wire with only a handful of scores separating first and second place. (Keep in mind that the above scores represent only those scores submitted during the competition scoring period.)

We’d like to extend a big thank you to the Cureus community for their efforts in reading and scoring competition articles over the past few months. Without you, this competition would not be possible.

And remember – even though the competition is over, you can still access and score all of the articles. Thanks for your support!

We Just Made Publishing Even Easier: Introducing the New Cureus Publishing System

After months of hard work, we’re very excited to introduce the brand new Cureus publishing system! Are you ready to submit your next (or your first) article to Cureus? Well, there’s no time like the present – the new publishing system is live right now.

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We’ve collected your feedback over the past few years and we’ve done our best to incorporate as many of your suggestions as possible. We’ll continue to iterate over the coming months, so if you have any more suggestions or complaints, don’t be afraid to let us know!

It’s important to note that this change will only affect drafts started on or after Tuesday, September 6th, 2016 – any drafts started before today will utilize the existing submission system.

  • Tackle your article submission with a new, easy-to-follow, step-by-step process
  • Select from available channels and competitions via new branded icons and dedicated channel and competition pages
  • Curate and insert figures, tables and video from your media library
  • Preview your article draft at any time during the submission process

For more information, we encourage you to check out our Author Guide, which has been updated with brand new guidelines and instructions.

As always, should you have any questions or concerns when submitting your work to Cureus, please drop us a note at support@cureus.com.

Announcing the Winners of the Investigational Cardiac Radiosurgery Publishing Competition!

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The SIQ scoring period has ended and the scores have been tabulated. Without further ado, the winning article is…

‘Cost-Effectiveness of Cardiac Radiosurgery for Atrial Fibrillation: Implications for Reducing Health Care Morbidity, Utilization, and Costs’ by Nikhilesh Bhatt, Mintu Turakhia and Thomas J. Fogarty (7.17 SIQ)

We’d like to extend a big thank you to the Cureus community for their efforts in reading and scoring competition articles over the past few months. Without you, this competition would not be possible.

And remember – even though the competition is over, you can still access and score all of the articles. Thanks for your support!

– Cureus and CyberHeart

Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Winning Articles Announced!

Eighteen published articles. More than 300 SIQ scorings. Over 10,500 views. And now, three winning articles!

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Congratulations are in order for the following authors – as their articles

  1. 1st place: ‘3D-Printing of Arteriovenous Malformations for Radiosurgical Treatment: Pushing Anatomy Understanding to Real Boundaries’ by Conti, Pontoriero, Lati, Marino, La Torre, Vinci, Germano, Pergolizzi and Tomasello
  2. 2nd place: ‘Prognostic Value of MR Imaging Texture Analysis in Brain Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Oligo-Metastases Undergoing Stereotactic Irradiation’ by Nardone, Tini, Biondi, Sebaste, Vanzi, De Otto, Rubino, Carfagno, Battaglia, Pastina, Cerase, Mazzoni, Buonamici and Pirtoli
  3. 3rd place: ‘Robotic Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Intramedullary Spinal Cord Metastases: A Case Report and Literature Review’ by Garcia, Sallabanda, Santa-Olalla, Guerra, Aviles, Sallabanda, Rivin and Samblas

In addition to the winning articles listed above, the competition has produced 15 more high-quality articles from around the world, all of which are available free of charge on the competition page.

We’d like to extend a big thank you to the Cureus community for their efforts in reading and scoring competition articles over the past few months. Without you, this competition would not be possible.

And remember – even though the competition is over, you can still access and score all of the articles. Thanks for your support!

– Cureus and Accuray

Publishing all credible science: Where do we draw the line?

Stemming from the belief that market-driven open access publishers are inherently predisposed to publish any article for which an author is willing to pay, there is a common prejudice that the scientific quality of such articles must be inferior to those published within non-open access journals. Whether true or not for other journals, this rationale certainly does not apply to a free publication model like Cureus.

For us, ensuring scientific quality is about preserving the brand of Cureus; by undermining credibility, bad science will, over the long term, inevitably diminish every conceivable measure of journalistic success. Destroying our reputation is the last thing Cureus leadership wants to see happen. However, working against this same concern is our journal’s philosophical commitment to publish all “credible” medical science; inevitably these two contradicting objectives require a delicate balancing act.

Despite (or as a sad result of) Cureus’ idealism, our journal sometimes receives questionable submissions: carelessly prepared manuscripts, sloppily presented results, poorly argued and unfounded conclusions, etc. Authors occasionally suffer from the misperception, perhaps due to our status as an open access journal, that we will publish whatever they submit and therefore they need invest only minimal effort.

Not so fast! I must caution against such thinking. Cureus is happy to publish articles that might be rejected elsewhere due to “political” or contrarian philosophical reasons, but like most quality journals, we will not abide substandard manuscripts. Cureus takes peer review and editorial oversight very seriously. Ensuring that authors do not abuse the easy-to-use Cureus submission system is quickly becoming a full-time job for editors who, frankly, have many better things to do.

Please do not confuse the ease of Cureus submission process with a willingness to overlook second-rate science. Does your article have a clear message and can it help interested colleagues in their daily clinical and/or scientific work? Put yourself in a reader’s shoes; if you were a reader, would you feel that the author in question has shown proper respect for your time? If you cannot answer yes, please do not submit your article to Cureus.

Anyone who intends to submit a shoddy article (and yes, you know who you are), be prepared to be blocked during editorial review. And should anyone choose to abuse Cureus’ generous spirit more than once, they should expect to be banned from our platform for an eternity. Meanwhile, the vast majority of conscientious authors, who both respect their potential readers and do their utmost to produce a quality manuscript, will be amply rewarded with a hassle-free submission process, and, once published, a large, appreciative audience of readers.

Ultimately we at Cureus like to think that a beautiful article of science is in itself, the best reward possible. Thank you for your understanding, cooperation and support.

Scholarly Roulette: Impact Factor & Scientific Quality

A friend and colleague referred me to a recent publication that represents a major indictment of the peer-reviewed journal cartel.

This article summarizes a blog published by what is arguably a Cureus competitor, the open access-publishing house, Frontiers, which in this study could find no correlation between rates of rejection and journal impact factor.

Just for argument’s sake, let’s assume that impact factor does correlate with scientific quality. So if this study is correct, it means by extension that the rate of rejection also doesn’t correlate with quality. In turn this means that the standard peer review process (which totally dominates the journal industry) has no bearing on article quality. In other words, getting published, or not, appears to be a random event.

Accepting this fact (parenthetically one which I already subscribe to) means that despite all the process and rituals of scientific journal publishing, and the huge importance of this matter to society and academic tenure decisions, there is currently no objective index for assessing research article quality. Of course if one believes that impact factor is not a measure of quality, then the above random publication process is even more random than I implied in my argument! Based on this observation, I would like to sarcastically suggest we should rename this current process “scholarly roulette.”

Clearly there are huge shortcomings to the Frontiers study, such as selection bias and the non-medical nature of many scholarly journals. However, to a huge research community that has invested so much of their lives into the existing peer review process these type of findings must be dispiriting. Nevertheless, this current set of observations does resonate with our philosophy at Cureus, where we subscribe to the belief that as long as the medical science within is credible, there is no reason not to publish an article. In other words, we believe that we are, on average, no better equipped to discern quality than any other journal.

A big part of our confidence stems from Cureus’ unique post-publication SIQ scoring system. Although we are no smarter in finding scientific quality up front, we do believe that it is quite possible for the medical community-at-large to find quality over time, post publication. Nevertheless, to make this a reality, every reader has a role to play, which of course includes you!

Exceptional Responders in Oncology: Winning Case Report Announced!

51 published case reports. More than 1,200 SIQ scorings. Over 12,000 views. Only 1 winner.

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Congratulations to Mark ZakiPam LaszewskiNatasha RobinetteHusain SalehNaweed RazaAmmar Sukari & Harold Kim! Their case report, entitled ‘Unresectable Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma of the Neck: Early Tumor Response to Chemoradiotherapy,’ received the highest SIQ score, with an 8.2 (which has since risen to a stellar 8.5).

In addition to the winning article, we received dozens of high-quality case reports from around the world, all of which are now published and available free of charge.

We’d like to extend a big thank you to the Cureus community for their efforts in reading and scoring dozens of case reports over the past few months. Without you, this competition would not be possible – you’ve helped shine a spotlight on dozens of interesting cases of exceptional responders in oncology.

And remember – even though the competition is over, you can still access and score any of the 51 case reports. Stay tuned for news about our next competition – launching soon!